FARM 432

Protein bred in 432 hours

 

- PATENT PENDING -

This product is in its Beta status and is currently taking big leaps towards manufacturing. We will update you soon on ways to co-finance the realization of this product. Please also follow our Twitter account for the most current news.

BACKGROUND:

Industrial scale production of animal meat is intense in its use of resources. One third of croplands worldwide are used to produce animal feed. 80% of antibiotics are fed to animals and livestock is the single biggest factor for climate change. Livestock feed is one of the most important key factors for the environmental impact of meat production. Elaborate research into this topic revealed opportunity for a more independent, decentralized way of farming protein. 

IDEA:

Farm 432 enables people to become independent from the system of current meat production by growing their own protein source at home. After 432 hours, 1 gram of black soldier fly eggs turn into 2.4 kilogram of larvae protein, larvae that self-harvest and fall clean and ready to eat into a harvest bucket.  Black soldier fly adults don´t eat, therefore they don´t have any mouth parts and do not transmit any disease. The larvae can be fed on bio waste, therefore the production almost costs no water or CO2. Black soldier fly larvae are one of the most efficient protein converters in insects, containing up to 42% of protein (dried), a lot of calcium and amino acids.

FUNCTION:

  1. Pupae are put into birthday box in order to start the breeding process. From there, flies emerge and fly out into the mating chamber, where they mate, drink and lay eggs into the nozzles. Hatched larvae fall from the nozzles into the feeding volume.

 

1. Pupae are put into birthday box in order to start the breeding process. From there, flies emerge and fly out into the mating chamber, where they mate, drink and lay eggs into the nozzles. Hatched larvae fall from the nozzles into the feeding volume.

  2. After feeding on kitchen scraps for around 2 weeks, premature larvae self- harvest in crawling up a ramp.

 

2. After feeding on kitchen scraps for around 2 weeks, premature larvae self- harvest in crawling up a ramp.

  3. Harvest drawer with harvested larvae. The volume is configured to breed about 500g of harvest per week.This makes about 2 meals.

 

3. Harvest drawer with harvested larvae. The volume is configured to breed about 500g of harvest per week.This makes about 2 meals.

END PRODUCT:

  Bon Appetit!

 

Bon Appetit!

  Yum again! Larvae Granola "Grubnola", initially developed for Future Food Salon 2014 in Austin, TX

 

Yum again! Larvae Granola "Grubnola", initially developed for Future Food Salon 2014 in Austin, TX

PROCESS:

  One third of croplands with carbohydrate and protein rich plants, as well as many additional resources, is used for production animal feed.

 

One third of croplands with carbohydrate and protein rich plants, as well as many additional resources, is used for production animal feed.

  Feed efficiency.

 

Feed efficiency.

  And you are eating them already! We eat about 500 g of insects per year, in our everyday food.

 

And you are eating them already! We eat about 500 g of insects per year, in our everyday food.

  Choosing an insect with best qualities to breed.

 

Choosing an insect with best qualities to breed.

  432 hours from egg to harvested larvae. The fly lives for a few day in which it solely drinks, the larva self harvests and falls clean into a harvest drawer.

 

432 hours from egg to harvested larvae. The fly lives for a few day in which it solely drinks, the larva self harvests and falls clean into a harvest drawer.

  Starting the breeding process ...

 

Starting the breeding process ...

  Design Process

 

Design Process

  Details

 

Details

This project was awarded Best Food Design 2013 by Core77 and received the Honorary Outstanding Artist Award 2014 in the category Experimental Design. 

This project was awarded Best Food Design 2013 by Core77 and received the Honorary Outstanding Artist Award 2014 in the category Experimental Design. 

credits of project: Katharina Unger for L I V I N Studio